Question details:

How large can the sail maker label be on sails? Or the manufacturer label on other items of equipment? The class rules do not restrict this?

Answer:

The relevant rules are contrained in the World Sailing Advertising Code, also known as Regulation 20.

Clause 20.7.1 states that the display of manufacturer's and sailmaker's marks is permitted at all times as detailed in Table 2 but not in areas that area reserved for Event Advertising. For radio controlled boats the area reserved for Event Advertising is 40% of the hull length on each side of the hull from the foremost point on the hull. No Event Advertising is permitted on the boom(s), backstay or sails.

20.7.2 tells us a manufacturer's mark may include the name, logo or other identification marks of the designer or manufacturer of the equipment.

20.7.3 tells us that a sailmaker's mark may include the name, logo or other identification marks of a sailmaker or of the sail cloth manufacturer or the pattern or model of the sail.

Table 2 – Manufacturer’s and Sailmaker’s Marks

Radio-controlled boat

Hull  - On each side of the hull, and may include the name or mark of the designer or builder - One mark to fit within a rectangle measuring 15% of hull length x 150mm                     

Spars and Equipment - On each side of spars and on each side of other equipment - One mark not exceeding 50mm length                    

Sails - On each side of sails and kites - One mark to fit within a 50mm diameter circle

 

 

 

 

 

Question details:

How might a rc foiling class take off?

Answer:

There are not many such boats around so, even if they did all meet the criteria suggested for an international class, it seems unlikely that fleets large enough for a meaningful race would exist for a while. However, if the boats met the suggested criteria a comparison of speed, perhaps around an agreed size and format of course, becomes a useful comparison of achievement level.

A 'speed week-end' where boats gather and are timed around a course might be an interesting starting point too.

Question details:

Class rules for an international foiling class? What may be useful restrictions in a class rule for a foiling class that might become an international class? 

Answer:

There seems to be some interest in creating foiling multihulls for rc sailing. It may be useful for those developing such boats to be contrained by some restrictions so that the boats may fit within a 'class'. Comparisons of performance, whether measured by speed, foiling ability, manoeuvrability or some other criterion, then become meaningful. For this reason, and to assist those who are experimenting with such boats to move more quickly towards an international class should they wish to form one, a sub-committee of the IRSA TC led by Ian Holt has considered what restrictions might apply.

They can be summarised as:

  • The Mini40, MultiOne classes may be suitable starting points
  • Alternatively a 1 metre x 1 metre box may be a suitable restriction for the hull(s)
  • Foils should be permitted to extend outboard of the hulls but that restriction should be limited to a modest figure, say 100 mm
  • Automation of control should be permittted
  • The type of course might be prescribed in the class rules
  • Rig height should be restricted
  • Measurement of sail area may be unnecessary *
  • A minimum weight (without rig) might be useful **
  • A maximum draft of not more than 700 mm ***

 To expand a little on these:

The speed of a foiling boat can be high and is not linked to length as in monohull keelboats. A small hull size helps with transportability and construction.

It has been found easier to add foils to the outside of hulls but their extension should be restricted so that RRS 11 can be complied with easily.

On board computing that imparts a degree of autonomous control (height, pitch etc) much like that given to a drone, and for sail/rig control, would make sailing the boats easier.

Windward ability may be limited and class rules that prescribe a short beat and long reaches may be preferred to the traditional rc sailing course.

All the other international rc sailing classes now restrict the maximum rig height/mainsail luff length in some way - this is useful as it keeps rigs small enough to fit into a modest size car and permits them to be transported economically by plane. A minimum rig height (no smaller than for an IOM) would ensure no problem with placement of RRS App E size sail marks. It also sets a virtual upper limit to wind speed used for racing and a clear boundary so sailors can be properly prepared for the 'worst' conditions they will need to cope with.

*   Ian Holt noted that sail area was not really an important speed limiting factor except a very low wind speeds.

**   I suggest a minimum weight (sailing condition less rig) might serve to constrain how hi-tech construction methods need become in the longer term in order to keep the class open to those whose building techniques are not of the highest levels. An important factor if the class is to be open to many.

*** IRSA regulations precribe that a class may choose a maximum draught of not more than 700 mm. This is so that a race committee can ensure sufficient water depth for all boats over the course area for their event.

 

Question details:

Does the Certification Authority have to use an official stamp in the relevant place when issuing a certificate?

Answer:

There is no prescribed requirement for the size or style of ‘official stamp’. At an event the person inspecting the official stamp on a certificate has no means of knowing if it is the correct one or not. The important thing is that the issuing Certification Authority will recognise it at some future stage should the certificate be referred back to it for any reason.

Any size or style of official stamp will suffice providing the CA is happy that it can recognise it as authentic at a later stage.

Answer:

An event can be run using "single certificates"

If it is considered desirable at a particular event to ensure a sailor cannot choose the best configuration to suit the prevailing conditions, the event organiser can issue a Notice of Race, and a Sailing Instruction, requiring a certificate to be lodged at some prescribed time ahead of the event and to use the boat in that configuation. This also prevents owners of multiple boats from choosing which boat to use at the time of the race.

 

Answer:

Starting in around February 2015, class rule changes were introduced and discussed within the IRSA Technical Committee. The proposed rule changes were circulated to IRSA Designated National Members (DNMs) around December 2015 and January 2016. A number of DNMs responded with comments, and these were addressed by the TC Chairman. The proposed revised class rules were then brought to the Executive Committee by the TC Chairman in March 2016, which the EC formally voted on and approved. The rules, and an explanation of the changes, were published in April 2016, and came into effect in July 2016 after minor errors were found and edits made. This is the process which has been used in the previous decades of rule changes by the IMYRU, ISAF-RSD, and now IRSA.  

Answer:

It is inevitable that a new set of class rules may have a rule which is thought to be in error or in need of amendment. Suggest a rule change to your DNM. If it agrees, or if you are the DNM, send it to the TC Chairman for further discussion. Please read carefully our regulations and Q&A to avoid unnecessary work before you send any suggestions to the TC. Proposals for rule changes should be based on meaningful technical evidence and not on loud repetitions.  

Question details:

At what point, on change of ownership, does the certificate become invalid?

Answer:

The certificate becomes invalid upon a change of ownership. The change of ownership is the important criterion – not the signing of the certificate by the new owner – not the issue of the new certificate in the new owner’s name.

However, while the concept of ownership is normally well understood between any two people it may be that the law of the land becomes relevant in particular cases and this may vary depending on the contract involved and where the ‘transaction’ takes place.

The view is that IRSA class rules are not intended to, nor do they, shed any light on ownership or when it changes hands.

Question details:

What is the difference between a Q&A and a Class Rules Interpretation?

Answer:

An interpretation is requested when it is not clear (to a designer, builder, measurer, class association or certification authority) how a class rule shall be interpreted. When an interpretation is issued it should be kept in mind that the interpretation is valid until the class rules are changed or for two years maximum only. The purpose of this last rule is that two years gives sufficient time to consider if the effect of the interpretation is a) desirable or b) undesirable. Depending on the decision or choice (a or b, by the IRSA TC or the class depending on whether there is an independent class organisation or not) the class rules can be revised accordingly.

Thus, when drafting any interpretation, it should be kept in mind how the class rules should/could be revised to make the original interpretation request redundant.

It follows that, if no revised class rule can be written, there is no need to issue an interpretation. Where no interpretation is required, but only an explanation of the effect of the class rules, it follows that it would be appropriate to deal with the original request by issuing a Q&A to be published on the IRSA website and elsewhere as appropriate.

This is the guiding principle used by the IRSA Technical Committee when considering any question about the class rules whether it is a formal request for an interpretation or not.

 

Answer:

The ERS is a document maintained by the ISAF which is a revised on the same 4 year cycle as the Racing Rules of Sailing. The current version may be found on the ISAF website and there are several versions in translation listed there too.

http://www.sailing.org/documents/isaf-equipment-rules.php