Question details:

How large can the sail maker label be on sails? Or the manufacturer label on other items of equipment? The class rules do not restrict this?

Answer:

The relevant rules are contrained in the World Sailing Advertising Code, also known as Regulation 20.

Clause 20.7.1 states that the display of manufacturer's and sailmaker's marks is permitted at all times as detailed in Table 2 but not in areas that area reserved for Event Advertising. For radio controlled boats the area reserved for Event Advertising is 40% of the hull length on each side of the hull from the foremost point on the hull. No Event Advertising is permitted on the boom(s), backstay or sails.

20.7.2 tells us a manufacturer's mark may include the name, logo or other identification marks of the designer or manufacturer of the equipment.

20.7.3 tells us that a sailmaker's mark may include the name, logo or other identification marks of a sailmaker or of the sail cloth manufacturer or the pattern or model of the sail.

Table 2 – Manufacturer’s and Sailmaker’s Marks

Radio-controlled boat

Hull  - On each side of the hull, and may include the name or mark of the designer or builder - One mark to fit within a rectangle measuring 15% of hull length x 150mm                     

Spars and Equipment - On each side of spars and on each side of other equipment - One mark not exceeding 50mm length                    

Sails - On each side of sails and kites - One mark to fit within a 50mm diameter circle

 

 

 

 

 

Question details:

At what point, on change of ownership, does the certificate become invalid?

Answer:

The certificate becomes invalid upon a change of ownership. The change of ownership is the important criterion – not the signing of the certificate by the new owner – not the issue of the new certificate in the new owner’s name.

However, while the concept of ownership is normally well understood between any two people it may be that the law of the land becomes relevant in particular cases and this may vary depending on the contract involved and where the ‘transaction’ takes place.

The view is that IRSA class rules are not intended to, nor do they, shed any light on ownership or when it changes hands.

Question details:

What is the difference between a Q&A and a Class Rules Interpretation?

Answer:

An interpretation is requested when it is not clear (to a designer, builder, measurer, class association or certification authority) how a class rule shall be interpreted. When an interpretation is issued it should be kept in mind that the interpretation is valid until the class rules are changed or for two years maximum only. The purpose of this last rule is that two years gives sufficient time to consider if the effect of the interpretation is a) desirable or b) undesirable. Depending on the decision or choice (a or b, by the IRSA TC or the class depending on whether there is an independent class organisation or not) the class rules can be revised accordingly.

Thus, when drafting any interpretation, it should be kept in mind how the class rules should/could be revised to make the original interpretation request redundant.

It follows that, if no revised class rule can be written, there is no need to issue an interpretation. Where no interpretation is required, but only an explanation of the effect of the class rules, it follows that it would be appropriate to deal with the original request by issuing a Q&A to be published on the IRSA website and elsewhere as appropriate.

This is the guiding principle used by the IRSA Technical Committee when considering any question about the class rules whether it is a formal request for an interpretation or not.

 

Answer:

The ERS is a document maintained by the ISAF which is a revised on the same 4 year cycle as the Racing Rules of Sailing. The current version may be found on the ISAF website and there are several versions in translation listed there too.

http://www.sailing.org/documents/isaf-equipment-rules.php