Answer:

IRSA would like to see the RG65 class form a class committee within the IRSA structure. Although currently organised on a regional structure of representation, IRSA is in the process of re-structuring into a class based organisation. When any class committee becames self-sufficient, IRSA policy is that it should split off to become an independent ICA in the same way as IOMICA. 

Answer:

That pathway would be: 

  • Use the revised class rules 
  • Achieve sufficient registered boats in sufficient countries and continents 
  • Apply to IRSA for International Status 
  • Apply to hold a world championship. 

Answer:

Of course, but it may take longer to arrive at a result that is satisfactory to IRSA. 

Answer:

The draught limit is to ensure all boats at an event can be guaranteed to be able to sail. From an IRSA point of view it is imperative that the race committee of an IRSA event does not find itself embarrassed because some competitors with class rule compliant boats cannot compete.  

Answer:

Briefly: 

  • The class rules would be written in the WS SCR format using terms defined in the ERS. 
  • The sail measurement system would be specified 
  • Ballast materials denser than lead would be prohibited 
  • A draught limit would be introduced 
  • Sail marks rules would be rationalised with those in Appendix E of the RRS 
  • The rules for racing will be specified as the RRS. 
  • Changing the fin/ballast unit after each day’s racing could either be facilitated by the class rules or, alternatively, prohibited. 
  • Measurement and certification of boats would be by independent official measurers 
  • Each national association would keep a register of officially certified boats

Answer:

An issue that would prevent the RG65 achieving international status is the tradition that the boats are measured by the owners with no independent checking. A complicating factor here is a lack of a prescribed system for measuring sail area.

Another tradition in the class, that of being able to replace the fin/ballast unit after each day’s racing, is not permitted either by the current class rules or the Racing Rules of Sailing.

The current lack of restriction on the material used for the ballast means that Tungsten (also known as Wolfram) and other exotic high density materials are permitted. The unwelcome cost implications of this in the long term are clear.

The concept of having only three rigs in the class is a sound principle that works well in the IOM class. Whereas the IOM class has several safeguards to keep cost down (no exotic materials in the hull, minimum hull weight, wood or aluminium spars only, one design sails) there are no such restrictions in the RG65 class and construction costs are higher than they would be otherwise. It is probably too late to introduce some of these concepts into the RG65 class – as “the horse has already bolted”. But there are some things that can easily be achieved that will help keep the class popular in the long term and restrict escalation of costs. 

Answer:

Class rules written using the WS SCR format ensure that as far as possible the language used and the measurement methods employed by the class rules are harmonised across the classes. Designers, builders, sail makers and measurers can then be confident of having a common understanding of class rules.

Commonly used words like ‘boat’, ‘hull’, ‘hull appendage’ and a vast number of other similar boat part names are all very precisely defined in the Equipment Rules of Sailing (ERS) which is a stand-alone document available as a download from the WS and IRSA websites. 

Answer:

To gain international class status some straightforward, but important, standards have to be achieved. 

  • The class has to have a certain number of boats across a certain number of continents and countries. 
  • The class rules have to be written to a common standard, the WS Standard Class Rules (SCR) format.

Whereas the numerical requirements are met, it is clear the requirement for WS SCR format class rules is not.

Answer:

The class appeals to a large number of builders because they can exploit exotic construction methods without the problems associated with larger scale building projects. Construction can be as convenient as on a kitchen table. Sail making can be accomplished in a relatively small space. The class is a ‘development’ or ‘open’ class so builders have freedom to improve performance that is deliberately blocked in ‘one design’ or ‘closed’ classes.

The boat with all its rigs will comfortably fit into a well designed pack not much bigger than a box used to transport an IOM hull. The prospect of travelling by public transport, as well as by plane without having to pay for excess baggage, is a realistic one. The restriction on the number of rigs serves to restrict cost and complexity, and the boats can be sailed in a space as small as an Olympic swimming pool. A well set up RG65 performs remarkably well, so it is easy to see why the class is popular.

It is consistent with IRSA’s constitutional object to develop the sport of rc sailing throughout the world to lend support to any class that is popular internationally.

Given the opportunity to hold world championships the class would inevitably attract greater numbers of participants and the level of competition in the class would increase enormously. It is essential that robust class rules are in place before that happens so that continued participation in the class does not become prohibitively expensive.  

Wtih well designed and managed class rules there is no reason why the class cannot become an international class and hold a world championship in the near future leading to even greater numbers being attarcted to the class - for this reason IRSA is interested in the class. 

Answer:

Not as it exists at present.

Some time back WS delegated responsibility for the international administration of radio sailing to IRSA and it is through this affiliation that IRSA is able to grant the right to run WORLD championships in the rc international classes. WS protects the right to call a sailing event a world championship – claiming an event is one when it is not sanctioned by WS or IRSA is a breach of the WS rules and can result in competitors being excluded from legitimate sailing events.

IRSA is the international class association for the Marblehead, Ten Rater and A Classes. The International One Metre has its own independent international class association, IOMICA, that is responsible for the administration of the IOM class and which is affiliated to IRSA. All these international classes hold world championships from time to time and the events are run under the guidance of IRSA’s & IOMICA’s regulations using the well known Appendix E of the Racing Rules of Sailing (RRS).

In order that the RG65 class may hold any event titled ‘world championship’ it has to have international class status given by IRSA.

Question details:

What is the difference between a Q&A and a Class Rules Interpretation?

Answer:

An interpretation is requested when it is not clear (to a designer, builder, measurer, class association or certification authority) how a class rule shall be interpreted. When an interpretation is issued it should be kept in mind that the interpretation is valid until the class rules are changed or for two years maximum only. The purpose of this last rule is that two years gives sufficient time to consider if the effect of the interpretation is a) desirable or b) undesirable. Depending on the decision or choice (a or b, by the IRSA TC or the class depending on whether there is an independent class organisation or not) the class rules can be revised accordingly.

Thus, when drafting any interpretation, it should be kept in mind how the class rules should/could be revised to make the original interpretation request redundant.

It follows that, if no revised class rule can be written, there is no need to issue an interpretation. Where no interpretation is required, but only an explanation of the effect of the class rules, it follows that it would be appropriate to deal with the original request by issuing a Q&A to be published on the IRSA website and elsewhere as appropriate.

This is the guiding principle used by the IRSA Technical Committee when considering any question about the class rules whether it is a formal request for an interpretation or not.

 

Answer:

The ERS is a document maintained by the ISAF which is a revised on the same 4 year cycle as the Racing Rules of Sailing. The current version may be found on the ISAF website and there are several versions in translation listed there too.

http://www.sailing.org/documents/isaf-equipment-rules.php