Question details:

Does the Certification Authority have to use an official stamp in the relevant place when issuing a certificate?

Answer:

There is no prescribed requirement for the size or style of ‘official stamp’. At an event the person inspecting the official stamp on a certificate has no means of knowing if it is the correct one or not. The important thing is that the issuing Certification Authority will recognise it at some future stage should the certificate be referred back to it for any reason.

Any size or style of official stamp will suffice providing the CA is happy that it can recognise it as authentic at a later stage.

Question details:

Use of boats with certificates issued by sources other than IRSA affiliated bodies?

Is it possible to enter an event described in the NoR and SIs as for boats of an international class (IOM,. M, 10R or A Class) with a certificate other than an IRSA certificate issued by a body affiliated to IRSA?

Answer:

No.

The IRSA international classes are distinct from classes using the same name but which are not administered (ultimately) by IRSA. For example the Naviga administered One Metre, Marblehead and Ten Rater classes are different classes and the certificates issued under those rules are not valid for IRSA events (world or continental championships) or events normally organised by IRSA affiliated bodies. The same is true for the Marblehead class administered by the American Model Yachting Association which uses class rules different to the international class rules.

The owner of a boat in one of those classes can obtain a certificate for the international class after having his boat measured to the IRSA class rule. To do this he should find an official measurer (please see the Equipment Rules of Sailing) and then contact his certification authority (normally the body in his country that administer rc sailing and is affiliated to IRSA). If he is a member of a body affiliated to his World Sailing Member National Authority (the body responsible for the administration of SAILING in his country) he will then be eligible to take part in events for the international class.

Question details:

At what point, on change of ownership, does the certificate become invalid?

Answer:

The certificate becomes invalid upon a change of ownership. The change of ownership is the important criterion – not the signing of the certificate by the new owner – not the issue of the new certificate in the new owner’s name.

However, while the concept of ownership is normally well understood between any two people it may be that the law of the land becomes relevant in particular cases and this may vary depending on the contract involved and where the ‘transaction’ takes place.

The view is that IRSA class rules are not intended to, nor do they, shed any light on ownership or when it changes hands.

Question details:

What is the difference between a Q&A and a Class Rules Interpretation?

Answer:

An interpretation is requested when it is not clear (to a designer, builder, measurer, class association or certification authority) how a class rule shall be interpreted. When an interpretation is issued it should be kept in mind that the interpretation is valid until the class rules are changed or for two years maximum only. The purpose of this last rule is that two years gives sufficient time to consider if the effect of the interpretation is a) desirable or b) undesirable. Depending on the decision or choice (a or b, by the IRSA TC or the class depending on whether there is an independent class organisation or not) the class rules can be revised accordingly.

Thus, when drafting any interpretation, it should be kept in mind how the class rules should/could be revised to make the original interpretation request redundant.

It follows that, if no revised class rule can be written, there is no need to issue an interpretation. Where no interpretation is required, but only an explanation of the effect of the class rules, it follows that it would be appropriate to deal with the original request by issuing a Q&A to be published on the IRSA website and elsewhere as appropriate.

This is the guiding principle used by the IRSA Technical Committee when considering any question about the class rules whether it is a formal request for an interpretation or not.

 

Answer:

The ERS is a document maintained by the ISAF which is a revised on the same 4 year cycle as the Racing Rules of Sailing. The current version may be found on the ISAF website and there are several versions in translation listed there too.

http://www.sailing.org/documents/isaf-equipment-rules.php

Question details:

Section C of the class rules requires the hull registration number to be displayed legibly on the external surface of the hull with a minimum height of 20 mm.

Section D of the class rules requires the hull registration number to be permanently marked on a non-removable part of the hull surface.

Can a single set of hull registration numbers satisfy both rules?

Answer:

Yes. Providing the hull registration number digits are of minimum height 20 mm, are clearly legible, are easily visible, are painted, engraved, bonded in or moulded in, and are on a non-removable part of the hull then both rules are satisfied by a single set of numbers.

However, it is often more convenient and attractive to use vinyl numbers on the deck to satisfy the Section C rule and some more convenient method on an inside area to satisfy the Section D rule.

Bear in mind the purpose of the rules: the Section C rule is for the benefit of the race committee and other competiors at an event to help identify a boat when it does not have it's rig in place; the Section D rule is to permanently and uniquely identify a boat so that it may be grandfathered, if needed, at a later date. In 50+ year's time the number will also add value and interest to any boat that has survived that long.

Question details:

Why are boat weights and lengths not required to be checked at certification control (measurement)?

Answer:

It used to be normal for class rules to require all equipment to be checked for compliance with the class rules. It was also normal for the certificate or class rules to state that alterations would invalidate the certificate. Yet it was commonplace for owners to make alterations to their boat/equipment without returning to the measurer to have it re-checked. This made it tedious for scrupulous owners to enjoy the freedom to develop their boats in the same way that less scrupulous owners did.

Clearly, when a boat competes at an event it is important that it complies with the class rules in all aspects. However at certification control (measurement) it makes no sense to check the overall length or draught of a boat because those dimensions necessarily depend on the weight of the boat and its flotation which are in turn affected by the weight and placement of removable items (rudder, fin, ballast, rc equipment). By removing those checks from certification control a tank and accurate scales are not required before a certificate can be issued. Only at an event when those items are in place need, and can, those dimensions be checked. If a tank and accurate scales are available at certification control measurers are encouraged to monitor those checks if owners wish. But owners need to be made aware of their continuing responsibilities after the certificate has been issued.

The freedom granted to the owners to alter equipment is balanced by their responsibility to ensure that their boat complies with the class rules when competing at an event. It follows that equipment inspection at an event (always difficult when flotation has to be checked) is the only way to monitor correct compliance with the class rules. At an event a tank can be used to check all the boats, far more efficient than at each boat's certification control. 

Should a boat be found not to comply with the weight and dimensional limits the responsibility lies clearly and solely with the owner for failing to ensure compliance. Altering the boat and failing to take steps to ensure continued compliance with the class rules might be taken as a breach of RRS 69 by a jury.

 

Question details:

Where the deck is irregularly shaped near the mast, where is the correct place for the deck limit mark?

Answer:

The IOM class rules do not seek to restrict the shape of the deck near the mast. It would be complex to do so and the point to which rig height is measured is taken to be relatively non-critical.

A deck limit mark shall be displayed on the hull centreplane near to the mast position. The mark shall be a minimum of 5 mm in diameter.

It is for the owner to decide where to place the mark.

Once the mark is placed the measurer can carry out his measurements.

Equipment inspectors (event measurers) carrying out pre-race checks may wish to make the deck limit mark 'permanent' by signing over the top.

Question details:

A recent ruling for the IOM class says the certification authority for the hull is the DNM of the country where the owner is resident.  Does this apply to the M, 10R, and A Classes too?

Answer:

Yes.

The IOM, Marblehead, Ten Rater and A Class class rules indicate the certification measurement forms (measurement forms) are sent to the certification authority in the country where the hull is to be registered. This seems to give the owner some choice over where his hull is to be registered.  However, ERS C.3.1 defines the certification authority as 'the MNA of the owner'. Where the term certification authority is used it shall be understood to be the certification authority in the country where the owner is resident or in the country of which the owner is a national. This is normally the DNM (Delegated National Member for radio sailing) in the country.

Question details:

Who issues a certificate for any of the IRSA classes?

 

 

Answer:

 

 

The certification authority issues the certificate. As of 1st July 2016 all the IRSA classes have the same administrative section. It is A.9 that indicates it is the certification authority that issues a certificate.

The term 'certification authority' is defined in the ERS as:

For the hull: the ISAF, the MNA of the owner or their delegates.

For other items: the ISAF, the MNA of the country where the certification shall take place, or their delegates.

The members of IRSA are the bodies to which the administration of RC sailing has been delegated (if not the MNA of the country itself) and which are known as the DNMs. So, for the hull it is the IRSA DNM of the owner.

For other items it will usually be the same but it could be the MNA or delegate of MNA in another country where the emasurement took place. This would apply where, for example, sails were certified in house by a sailmaker who had been delegated the authority to do that.

See also the related Q&A concerning who is the certification authority, or DNM, for an owner.

Question details:

What sail identification marks shall be displayed when a hull holds a certificate in more than one class.

Answer:

When a boat races it shall carry the appropriate sail identification marks for that class. Providing they do not affect the legibility of the marks, alternative class insignia may remain on the sails.

Answer:

No. C.6.3 prevents the movement, articulation, retraction or extension of hull appendages (including the ballast). Additionally RRS 51, which is not excluded by Appendix E of the RRS, states that movable ballast ‘for the purpose of changing trim or stability’ is not allowed.

1994 CR 4.1.1 prevents movement of the ballast fore and aft and canting keels per se are not prohibited. However, when a race is un using the RRS and RRS 51 is not cancelled the effect is the same.

The same logic applies to the other classes too.

Question details:

Can a boat with a certificate in one class also hold a valid certificate in another class?

Answer:

There is no rule in any of the International One Metre, Marblehead, Ten Rater or A Class class rules which prevents a boat from having a valid certificate for another class.